The 3D Printing Handbook: Technologies, design and applications

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If you’re looking to master the key aspects of 3D printing, this book is for you.

The 3D Printing Handbook provides practical advice on selecting the right technology and how-to design for 3D printing, based upon first-hand experience from the industry’s leading experts.

In this book:

  • The mechanisms behind all major 3D printing technologies
  • The benefits and limitations of each technology
  • Decision making tools for technology selection
  • Actionable design advice and guidelines
  • Industry case studies from world-leading brands

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German Researchers Publish Paper that Shows Us Just What's in a Thingiverse 3D Design Remix

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The Sarahs’ successful prints: a dragon and a raven

The first time I ever 3D printed something was when 3DPrint.com’s editor-in-chief Sarah Goehrke and I visited Proto BuildBar together in 2015. We each chose designs from popular 3D printing platform Thingiverse – she went with a dragon design, and I printed out a small, black raven, which sits on my desk next to my Edgar Allan Poe coffee mug. I didn’t really think much about the Thingiverse designs or where they actually came from – I just knew that when I typed in what I was looking for, dozens of designs would pop up on my screen as if by magic; all I had to do was choose a favorite. Four researchers from Germany decided to explore the online design platform and determine just where all of the designs came from, and recently published a scientific article about what they discovered.

“Personally, I am fascinated by the creativity of the community. Sometimes you see a design and ask yourself how did they do this? And then, analyzing it, we found that often the answer was that people cleverly recombined what was already there,” Marco Wirth, from the University of Würzburg, told 3DPrint.com. “Much of the creative potential of the platform really lies in the open exchange of models.”

Wirth, together with fellow University of Würzburg researchers Christoph Flath and Frédéric Thiesse, and Sascha Friesike with the KIN Research Group of VU Amsterdam, investigated how Thingiverse users are able to reuse existing designs to make new ones – this is known in the 3D printing community as remixing.

In “true maker community fashion,” the researchers published a scientific article, titled “Copy, transform, combine: exploring the remix as a form of innovation,” in the Journal of Information Technology under a Creative Commons license, so anyone can read and use its contents.

The abstract reads, “With the emergence of open internet-based platforms in recent years, remixing has found its way from the world of music and art to the design of arbitrary physical goods. However, despite its obvious relevance for the number and quality of innovations on such platforms, little is known about the process of remixing and its contextual factors. This paper considers the example of Thingiverse, a platform for the 3D printing community that allows its users to create, share, and access a broad range of printable digital models. We present an explorative study of remixing activities that took place on the platform over the course of six years by using an extensive set of data on models and users.”

Blockbot V3.1: an example of a remix within Thingiverse

The researchers investigated four different aspects of the remixing practice, in order to form a set of “theoretical propositions and managerial implications,” starting with the basic role of the practice in design communities. The paper shows that remixing is a vitally important part of the success of Thingiverse, as over half of its available designs are based in remixes. A good example of a remixed Thingiverse design is the Blockbot V3.1, by Thingiverse user msruggles; you can even see on the design page that there have now been a total of five remixes of this design.

“The beauty of studying 3D printing is the fact that you can look at all the designs and print them for yourself. Research is often abstract but in this case we had a very visual experience that help to understand what is happening,” Friesike told 3DPrint.com. “I am especially surprised by how a few patterns can explain basically all the remix behavior we see on the platform.”

The team also studied the various patterns of remixing processes, and were able to illustrate that every bit of remixing activity on the platform is able to be explained by eight basic remix patterns. They denote two types of remix relationships – parent (Things the remix is based on) and child (the remix itself) – and grouped the patterns into separate classes: convergent, which are characterized by remix relationships with several parent designs, and divergent, delineated by relationships with several children designs.

The paper illustrated how, since the Thingiverse platform has grown, it has added features that make remixing easy, like the customizer in the browser window. Finally, the researchers explain the profile of users on the remixing platform, and how the practice is used as a creative tool by multiple user groups.

“As researchers we have known for a long time, that most ideas are based on existing knowledge. However, it is very difficult to show that. If we go to a company and ask them where their idea comes from, they will tell us, that they came up with all of it on their own,” Friesike explained. “We know that this is not true, but most of the time we are unable to show it. Within the 3D printing community the reuse is explicitly allowed and the mandatory declaration of the sources of inspiration allow us academics to explore how ideas evolve. In doing so, we show how much creative potential open knowledge entails. Besides a creative and passionate community, Thingiverse contains so many great designs because designers can inspire each other and nobody needs to fear that reusing someone else’s ideas might be frowned upon or downright illegal.”

Concept of remix relationships and generations.

Not everyone is a fan of remixing, which is technically a sophisticated type of plagiarism, and has a complicated status in terms of copyright law. But this paper provides a different take on the practice, and illustrates how the open community of Thingiverse is actually able to benefit from users building on others’ ideas. Discuss in the Thingiverse Remix forum at 3DPB.com.

OOKU® Creative 3D Printing Pen Kit – 3D Pen with 1.75mm PLA ABS Filament for Building, Crafting, Drawing, Prototyping | Smart AutoOff | Slim Light design | 3 Speed Auto Extrusion – PINK

OOKU 3D Printer Pen – Creativity Unleashed | with USB charger cable

Designed, tailored and optimized for everyday creations with the power of 3D Printing, all in a single doodle pen.

From simplicity of use with auto-feeding of any 1.75 mm PLA/ABS material, to the natural fit into your hands, to low temperature ceramic head, the OOKU 3D Doodle Pen brings your creative imaginations to life with OOKU’s micro 3D printing pen technology.

Quickly melt and cool the ABS/PLA/HIPS printing material to create rigid free standing structures, forms, and shapes. Create individual parts and pieces or combine pieces together to unleash your imagination.

On demand Prototyping, drawing, and crafting is here.

Features

- Ooku’s Natural Slim Fit design ensures the pen fits to your hand comfortably & naturally at just 52 grams.
-OLED display
- Simplicity of use -plug in, select filament type, heat up, and create.
- Plug into any USB power source for great mobility & use anywhere with power bank (with at least 2A output), laptop or wall adapter (not included)
- 3 Extrusion speeds with automatic flow, without the hassle of controlling temperatures.
- Slender 0.7mm tip takes precision and detailing to a new level.
- Lower temperatures and greatest heat efficiency keeping the pen cool and safe during use with ceramic head.
- Smart automatic shutdown after 10 minutes of idling

Product Includes

1 x OOKU 3D Pen Printer
3 x Multi-colored 1.75mm Biodegradable PLA filament packs (random colors)
1 x Pen Holder Stand
1 x USB Charger Cable (wall adapter not included)
1 x Manual

Safety and Warning Instruction

1. This 3D Pen is suitable for children and adults over 8 years of age. Supervision of small children during product use is required.
2. The output nozzle tip can reach 250 degrees F so keep your hands and fingers away from the nozzle and avoid direct contact.

Product Features

  • A HAND HELD 3D PRINTER PEN: Prototype, craft, and create pieces and objects by drawing with the pen using 3D printing plastics like 1.75mm ABS or PLA Filament – Think like a builder by combining parts and pieces of objects to form a new grander object.
  • CREATE EASILY with our simple of use Ooku 3D pen design. Just plug in, power on, select material type, heat up, and create. 3 adjustable automatic extrusion speeds without worrying about material flow, and without the hassle of setting different temperatures.
  • At 52 Grams, Ooku’s LIGHT NAUTRAL FIT design ensures the 3D Printing Pen fits into your hands comfortably and naturally – like holding a marker. No heavy or bulky shaped designs that cramp up your style and hands. NO maintenance or jams with our SMART Infeed and Extrusion design.
  • 3D Printer Kit BONUSES INCLUDE: – 3 set of random color 1.75 mm PLA filaments – Pen holder stand
  • USB POWER Cable Included – providing you with more flexibility to use and create outside or on the go, when connected to any power source like your Laptop, Battery Power Bank (2A output or greater). AC Wall adapter not included.

Check Out Our Website For Details…

Fidget Spinner / Tri Spinner – Long Spintime – Injection Molded Design – Non-3D Printed. Hybrid Ceramic Bearings with Quality Guarantee, by FidgetDoctor (White)

DISCLAIMER: We are NOT real Doctors…just fidgeters wanting to help fellow fidgeters.

We constantly have to be ‘doing’, or else we get bored. We have trouble focusing…our brains just want constant engagement. Sometimes when they aren’t fully engaged, we start to feel anxious. And then there are the times when stress starts to get the best of us (and who wants to use a stress ball these days?). Does this sound familiar? Don’t worry, you’re not alone and you are just a few spins away from calm.

When will your spinning device save you?

• When you’re sitting in the airport, dying from boredom, because your plane’s been delayed due to an ice storm.
• When your bosses 10 minute meeting turns into an hour long head-slapper.
• When you need to give your mind a break from a taxing project.
• When your phone dies and you have nothing to keep you busy.
• When you’re in deep thought and need a mindless activity that won’t distract you.
• When you need a quiet stress reliever to relax your nerves.
• When you just feel like fidgeting.

Your spinning fidget toy is…

Compact – Discretely take your spinner with you anywhere. It’s pocket-sized design lets you bring it to the office, on your morning train commute, to church, and everywhere in between.
Smooth – No rough 3D-printed edges here. Your fingers will love the smooth edges we’re able to achieve through our injection molding process.
Durable – High-quality ABS plastic gives your new spinner the durability you demand.
TSA-Friendly – As safe to bring through a TSA checkpoint as your wristwatch.

Product Features

  • SHIPS FROM THE USA! Don’t be fooled. Others claiming to be genuine FidgetDoctorTM are simply imposters.
  • Stop Fidgeting, Start Spinning: The FidgetDoctorTM has your prescription! Reduce ADHD habits, calm your anxiety, occupy your mind, and make it through dreaded work meetings with this addictively gratifying fidget toy.
  • Long & Balanced Spinning: Our long-lasting center bearing utilizes Silicon Nitride (Si3N4) Ceramic Technology and is engineered for effortless, balanced, and lasting spins. Rated 40% stronger than steel bearings, they pack the durability needed for endless spinning. (Best results are achieved after a short 100-spin break-in period).
  • Smooth & Ergonomic Edges – No rough 3D-printed edges here. Your fingers will love the smooth edges we’re able to achieve through our injection molding process.
  • Spinning Techniques: Finger Spinning – Grip between your Thumb and Middle finger, flick with your Pointer or Ring finger. Tabletop Spinning – Place your spinner on a table or desk, hold the center with one finger and flick with another.

Visit The Website For More Information…

BMW combines 3D printing & virtual reality to streamline vehicle design

Mar 29, 2017 | By Tess

German auto manufacturer BMW, no stranger to 3D printing technologies, has announced its intention to combine additive manufacturing and virtual reality to help streamline and reduce the costs of its design processes.

3D printing and virtual reality have been developing side by side for several years, with both technologies becoming more and more advanced and increasingly accessible. It is hardly a surprise then that their trajectories have become intertwined in numerous ways. Earlier today we wrote about one instance of this intersection, as tech company HTC released its new MakeVR tool, which allows HTC Vive users to craft and 3D model in a virtual environment.

Now, it seems BMW is seeking to explore the benefits of combining both technologies for its own design-related purposes. In designing and developing a new vehicle, BMW would traditionally have to manufacture one or several prototypes for each part—a time-consuming and costly process. With the advancement of 3D printing, however, this task was made significantly easier, as the company was able to additively manufacture one-off prototypes in a more time and cost efficient manner.

By adding virtual reality into the mix, the car manufacturer is hoping to streamline its design and prototyping process even more. That is, in combining VR tech with 3D printing, BMW is confident that it can simplify and speed up its auto design stage by cutting back on the number of parts that even need to be additively manufactured.

How is this going to work? Well, BMW is reportedly working on a VR program (in collaboration with Unreal Engine) that is capable of recreating a variety of different surface finishes and features that are integrated into BMW’s vehicles. Using the VR technology, the company plans to project the virtual images onto 3D printed parts to see how they will look when they are finished and built into the car. This will allow BMW’s designers to see any early flaws with a particular design, and allow them to create and adapt a new virtual design.

Additionally, BMW also intends to use virtual reality and 3D printing in tandem in order to increase the efficiency of inter-departmental communications. By using the two technologies together, BMW says it will be easier to convey design ideas and directions to different teams, and will provide a more user-friendly experience for its employees.

For over 25 years, BMW has been a strong proponent of additive manufacturing technologies, not only using it for its own manufacturing needs, but also investing in up-and-coming 3D printing companies, and collaborating with various organizations, including Team USA. As always, we are eager to see its continued use and advancement of the technology.

Posted in 3D Printing Application

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