iNSTONE Easier 3D Printer Kit With iNSTONE Slice Software TF Card Sample PLA Filament Clean Kit Desktop 3D Printer DIY Mini 3D Printer Online print WIN/MAC

The INSTONE Mini 3D Printer boasts a 4.3x 4.3 x 4.9 inch, no need to leveling print bed, and an auto-calibrating extruder module which ensures the user gets the best possible prints.

Software: iNSTONE 3D, Cura, Simplify 3D, etc.
Material: PLA
Accuracy: 0.1mm

Build volume: 4.3 x 4.3 x 4.9 inch
Package size: 9.85 x 9.85 x 14 inch
G.W.: 3.8kg

Packing List:
Mini 3D Printer *1
Bottom Plate *1
Consumable *1
Power Supply *1
Date Line *1
TF Card *1
Card Reader *1
Glue Stick *1

Guaranty:
1 year for printer; 6 months for motor

Note: Do not touch the nozzle when using! Hot!

Product Features

  • Creativity – iNSTONE Easier 3D Printer inspires your imagination and wake your inner art talent.
  • Easy Use - Mini 3D Printer Just needs by 6 steps you can make any items you want. All the operations can be done just with a knob.
  • Portable – Light weight 5.3(lb) make you can easily enjoy 3d Printer diy everywhere and anytime whatever you are doing: working, preparing paper even cooking.
  • Big discount on filament – You will get 40% off on our filament after you ordered iNSTONE 3D Printer Kit.
  • iNSTONE Quality Assurance/Technical Assistance – Live service every day||ready to answer all technical questions ||Follow us: Skype: instone 3D / Facebook: Instone 3D/ Youtube: Instone 3D

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Testing treatments for bone cancer may get easier with enhanced 3D-printed scaffolds

Testing treatments for bone cancer tumors may get easier with new enhancements to sophisticated support structures that mimic their biological environment, according to Rice University scientists.

A team led by Rice bioengineer Antonios Mikos has enhanced its three-dimensional printed scaffold to see how Ewing’s sarcoma (bone cancer) cells respond to stimuli, especially shear stress, the force experienced by tumors as viscous fluid such as blood flows through bone. The researchers determined the structure of a scaffold, natural or not, has a very real effect on how cells express signaling proteins that help cancer grow.

The size and shape of pores and scaffold porosity — the percent of empty space in a structure created by pores — can impact cell attachment, alter the permeability of media and nutrients and facilitate cell migration, according to the researchers. The scientists said 3-D printing allows them to get closer than ever to mimicking the architecture of real bone.

The research is detailed in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering.

The scaffold itself is special, according to Mikos. The bone-like printed polymer contains pores of varying sizes to constrain fluids that flow through and apply varying degrees of shear stress to the tumor cells, depending on the scaffold’s orientation in relation to the flow.

“We aim to develop tumor models that can capture the complexity of tumors in vitro and can be used for drug testing, thus providing a platform for drug development while reducing the associated cost,” Mikos said. He noted that by varying the scaffold architecture, they can change the mechanical environment through which fluids flow and the magnitude of shear stress exerted on tumor cells.

Flat sections of scaffold were printed with pores in one of three sizes: 0.2, 0.6 and 1 millimeter. Three layers of each were stacked to make each 3-D scaffold, and these were seeded with tumor cells and placed in a flow perfusion reactor that mimics the push and pull of fluids and tissues in a biological environment. This makes simulations much more realistic than growing cells in a flat petri dish, Mikos said.

The researchers found that cells proliferated far better under flow than in conditions with no fluid flow. When the fluid began to flow, layers with the smallest pores, which restrict permeability, showed significantly more proliferation. They also found that under flow, cells increased their production of insulin-like growth factor protein (IGF-1), a ligand on the surface of sarcoma cells and part of the signaling pathway that plays a critical role in resistance to chemotherapy. Additionally, the orientation of the 0.2, 0.6 and 1 millimeter pore sizes played a role in how much IGF-1 the cells produced.

They suspected that the combination of shear stress and scaffold orientation prompted different levels of protein production.

The researchers now plan to refine their scaffold-printing process to study metastasis and test tumors’ response to drugs.

New tool could make 3D printing easier, faster

Researchers have developed a new tool that could allow novices design 3D printed objects in minutes that would otherwise take experts hours to make.

Any but the simplest designs require expertise with computer-aided design (CAD) applications, and even for the experts, the design process is immensely time consuming.

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Interdisciplinary Centre Herzliya in Israel aim to change that, with a new system that automatically turns CAD files into visual models that users can modify in real time.

Once the design meets the user’s specifications, they hit the print button to send it to a 3D printer.

“We envision a world where everything you buy can potentially be customised, and technologies such as 3D printing promise that might be cost-effective,” said Masha Shugrina, an MIT graduate student in computer science and engineering and one of the new system’s designers.

For a CAD user, modifying a design means changing numerical values in input fields and then waiting for at least a minute while the programme recalculates the geometry of the associated object.

Once the design is finalised, it has to be tested using simulation software. Those tests can take anywhere from several minutes to several hours, and they need to be rerun every time the design changes.

The new system, called Fab Forms, begins with a design created by a seasoned CAD user.

It then sweeps through a wide range of values for the design’s parameters – the numbers that a CAD user would typically change by hand – calculating the resulting geometries and storing them in a database.

For each of those geometries, the system also runs a battery of tests, specified by the designer, and it again stores the results.

The whole process would take hundreds of hours on a single computer, but in their experiments, the researchers distributed the tasks among servers in the cloud.

The researchers used eight designs, including a high-heeled shoe, a chess set, a toy car, and a coffee mug.

The system samples enough values of the design parameters to offer a good approximation of all the available options.

The researchers also developed some clever techniques to exploit similarities in design variations to compress the data, but the largest data set took up 17 gigabytes of memory.

Finally, the system generates a user interface, a Web page that can be opened in an ordinary browser.

The system automatically weeds out all the parameter values that lead to unprintable or unstable designs, so the sliders are restricted to valid designs.

However, if a particularly sharp-eyed user wanted a value for a parameter that fell between two of the samples stored in the database, the system can call up the CAD programme, calculate the associated geometry, and then run tests on it.