Impossible Objects raises $6.4M to grow staff in marketing, sales and R&D

Additive manufacturing startup Impossible Objects just stacked up a $6.4 million Series A.

Returning investor OCA Ventures led the round, which was also joined by IDEA Fund Partners, Mason Avenue Investments, Huizenga Capital Management and Inflection Equity Partners.

“3D printing is on a trajectory to disrupt traditional manufacturing,” said CEO Larry Kaplan. “We believe that we’ll accelerate that trajectory and be at the forefront of it.”

Impossible Objects uses composite-based additive manufacturing technology –– or CBAM –– to create functional parts and tools quickly and at scale.

Like most 3D printing, this technology relies on adding layers of material on top of each other to create a three-dimensional object. But Impossible Objects’s technology lets users use higher-strength materials and print at a faster pace.

To Kaplan, those features mean 3D printers can replace some of the equipment used in traditional manufacturing.

“The process involves feeding 2D sheets of composite materials into what is essentially an ink jet printer,” Kaplan said. “Ordinary [ink jet] heads wet the part shape onto the fabric, and the sheet goes through a system that drops thermoplastic powder across it. The powder sticks to where the sheet was wet, and the final stack of sheets is heated and pressed. The polymer bonds the sheets together to form the part.”

Impossible Objects is currently forming partnerships with original equipment manufacturers to test pilot versions of its printers. The company’s flagship printer, the Model One, will be commercially available sometime in 2018. 

Kaplan says the company’s printers have the capability to produce everything from automotive parts to medical devices.

“Impossible Objects is leading the way by using its technology to transform how the largest corporations manufacture,” said OCA Ventures general partner Ian Drury in a statement. “The market opportunity for a revolutionary industrial additive manufacturing solution such as Impossible Objects’ CBAM is enormous and the company has huge momentum right now.”

Impossible Objects plans to use its funding to grow its research and development team along with its sales and marketing staff. The company has a current headcount of 17 full-time employees, and Kaplan said he could easily foresee the team doubling in size during 2018.

 

Image via Impossible Objects.

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3D printer company Fracktal Works raises $3 million from 1 Neoteric Technology Solutions

BENGALURU: Fracktal Works, a Bengaluru-based 3D printer maker, has raised about Rs 19 crore ($3 million) from 1 Neoteric Technology Solutions, the subsidiary company of Neoteric Infomatique, one of the country’s largest IT distributors.

Fracktal, founded a yearand-a-half-ago by Rohit Asil and Vijay Raghav Varada, engineering students of Manipal Institute of Technology , has bagged clients like Larsen and Toubro, when it developed a desktop 3D printer Julia.

The startup claims that Julia is capable of printing models bigger than the MakerBot, printer, the world’s most popular 3D desktop printer. “We saw the potential in Fracktal as essentially a design focused company with competencies around taking an idea or concept through all the stages right up productisation,” said Anup Nair, head, technology solutions, Neoteric Infomatique and director, 1 Neoteric Technology Solutions.